Web

Bootstrap2hugo upgraded to Bootstrap 4

Posted on April 30, 2019

For a few years now, I’ve been using Hugo for my website as well as other websites as well. My first Hugo website was my own since I wanted to learn more about the technology before suggesting it to anyone else. Back then I was not able to find any minimalistic theme I liked, and for that reason, I started my own. As you can imagine from the name, I based it on Bootstrap, version 3 since that was the current version when I started to work on it.

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Calling a SOAP service in Go

Posted on December 3, 2018

Today the IT world is very focused on high performance, high throughput interfaces. In this situation, it is common to find REST and gRPC API, given their performances compared to the other solutions. Sometimes, though, we still encounter old API written with older techniques or new API that for some reasons have been developed with outdated technologies. One of those cases that I’ve encountered a few times over the last few months is SOAP.

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CORS with Go and Negroni

Posted on November 18, 2018

There are some pieces that you need to put in every microservice you write. Those are for instance logging, error handling, authentication. Over the last year, I found myself writing over and over CORS headers. This requirement brought me to think that I should have used a Negroni middleware since we are already using Negroni for other middlewares. I started looking online for an already written one, and I found a bunch, but I was not happy with what I found, so I decided to write my own.

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A lightweight approach to Go vanity import paths

Posted on September 23, 2018

Golang forces its users to use the repository URL of the dependency in the import statement. For instance, if we want to import the “test” package that is hosted at github.com/fale/test, we will need to use github.com/fale/test. In one hand this is very nice since it allows anyone reading the code to immediately understand where the code is hosted and therefore finding it very quickly. Also, this URL-based import path guarantees that no two different packages can have the same import path, preventing this kind of confusion for both programmers and the compiler itself.

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A small HTTP debug server in Go

Posted on August 31, 2018

Lately, I found myself to work on an application that was communicating via SOAP with a server. My goal was to understand how this application worked with the SOAP server to emulate its behavior. Even if I had access to the source code of the application, I thought it would have been easier, faster and more fun to do the work without actually reading the code. It’s important to note that actually, the application is fairly small and self-contained.

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WordPress

Posted on October 26, 2013 - Vignate, IT

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RESTful Web APIs by Leonard Richardson, Mike Amundsen, Sam Ruby (O'Reilly Media)

Posted on May 28, 2013

The API are now becoming more used every day. Today every major website provides it’s own set of API and often the company websites and services are chosen (or not chosen) based on the availability of API and their design. In this huge world that is getting bigger every day, RESTful API plays a huge role, in fact a lot of companies are moving their API to RESTful API since it’s easier to use, therefore more attractive for potential clients.

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Practical Anonymity, by Peter Loshin (Elsevier/Syngress)

Posted on May 7, 2013

The anonymity on the web is probably one of the most debated topics on the web. Is possible to be completely anonymous? The short answer is no. This book tries to help the read to improve its anonymity, staying is the “real world”, as the “Practical” world in the title suggests. In this book you will not find anything that is too complex for an average user. Whether this is good or bad, depends on you expectations.

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Hacking Web Apps by Mike Shema (Elsevier/Syngress)

Posted on April 16, 2013

Have you ever thought that the website you are developing or using is secure? Well, this book will make you change your opinion. This book will change your idea of security and therefor you’ll start to see anything as “probably having some security glitch”. Mike Shema speaks about a lot of different kind of attacks in his book in a real deep way, at the point that sometimes I wondered if he was planning to instruct people how to hack websites or only how to secure own websites.

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HTML5 Canvas for Developers by David Geary (O'Reilly Media)

Posted on April 2, 2013

As the name suggests, this set of videos is for developers. HTML 4 and Javascript are often used without much explaination about the JS code it self but only about the HTML5 Canvas part. I felt to point this out immediately since I’ve not found it on the O’Reilly page, but I believe that is really important to specify. Another thing that I’d like to point out is that (as it is easy to imagine, but not obvious) these videos only speak about 2D graphics in HTML (therefore there will no WebGL topics).

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